Turning The Tables: Impressive Questions You Should Ask Your Interviewers

Turning The Tables: Impressive Questions You Should Ask Your Interviewers

Many professionals have the perception that only the interviewing managers should be the ones asking questions when it comes to a job interview. Well, that is as far from the truth as it can get. As an interviewee, you have the right to inquire more about the roles you will potentially be taking if given the chance to work for the organization.

Taking charge of the interview by asking questions will also put you in a good light with the interviewers as it shows dedication and that you take responsibility for your future actions. But, being present for the interview itself is already a nerve-wracking experience for some. How then do we take control of the situation and grab the opportunity of asking the best questions?

Here are some great questions that you can consider asking, not only to impress the interviewers but also to learn more about the path you will be taking to advance in your career journey.

 

“What opportunities for growth will I have if I were to be given the chance to work with your company?”

When we look for a job, our primary goal is not only for monetary sustenance but to find an avenue to build our careers and grow as a professional. A red flag is raised when the interviewing manager fails to answer because it might mean that they do not have plans for the role you’ll be potentially taking, and the company is just filling up the positions in the company. 

By asking about the opportunity of growth, you will be putting yourself forward as a long-term thinker and have visions not only for the moment but in the long haul. If the answer is satisfactory to you, it gives you the chance to plan if this is the right company for you to embark with. 

 

“Given the opportunity to work with your company, how do you define success for the role I’ll be taking in a 6-month timeframe?”

This is a direct question that sheds light on the expectations they will have for you if you were to get the job on hand. The onboarding process sets the momentum and pacing for the role and gives you the chance to decide if it will be too overwhelming for you if the company decides to rush projects or tasks. 

It also shows readiness on your part and that you are prepared to prove your worth and accomplish a good start with the organization. 

 

“Do tell me more about the history of the position I am currently interviewing for”

This is one of, if not, the most crucial question you should be asking your hiring managers. If it is not a newly created role in the company, the task you will be handling has most likely been shaped and handed over by your predecessor or the current working team. 

Knowing the history of the position and why the previous title-holder left should give you a head start on the duties you will be helming should you decide to take on the post. By understanding the situation, you get to decide if you want to keep the cards dealt upon you. 

 

“With your experience as a manager in the company, can you tell me what are the most challenging obstacles I might be facing with the tasks I’ll be undertaking?”

Challenges will always be present no matter which job you decide to jump on. But sometimes, some hurdles might be way above your capabilities. Knowing the obstacles you might or will be facing in the future will give you a rough gauge on the position’s level of difficulty. 

 

“What is the leadership style here, and how is the company culture amongst employees?”

The company’s culture is one of the most vital aspects when finding a new career path. Its character and values are all embedded in the clockwork of an organization. Being conscious of the leadership style and company culture can give you an outlook of the years to come if you decide to take the opening. 

If you feel that it is a good fit, relationships formed with your co-workers as well as leaders will benefit you tremendously, and thus, you can express yourself and be the best productive professional you can be. 

 

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